Computer-On-Modules

COM Express Type 6

COM Express was developed and is maintained by PICMG (PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers Group). COM Express was released in the summer of 2005 and is the most widely used COM standard. The standard defines the physical size, interconnect, and thermal interface for a COM.The original COM Express specification was written to support peripherals that were available at the time of release – including USB 2.0, SATA, PATA, Ethernet, VGA, LVDS, SDVO, PCI, and PCI Express Gen 1. Several pinout types were defined by PICMG with each one having a specific combination of peripherals, expansion interfaces and connector layout. The most widely used COM Express module is a type 2, followed by type 1.
 
With the introduction of new display interfaces in the embedded market such as HDMI and Displayport it was time for a major upgrade of the COM Express specification. In the summer of 2010. The updated specification was called “PICMG® COM.0 rev 2.0”. and defined a new type 6 that allowed for HDMI, DVI and Displayport display interfaces, for USB 3.0 and for more PCI Express lanes. Besides the pinout changes two more form factors where formalized : COMPACT (95x95mm) and Mini (84x55mm).
 
The ADLINK computer-on-modules with built-in SEMA Cloud functionality is ready-made for Internet of Things (IoT) applications. ADLINK COM Express modules are able to connect legacy industrial devices and other IoT systems to the cloud, extract raw data from these devices, determine which data to save locally and which to send to the cloud for further analysis. The results these analyses can provide valuable information for policy decision making and generate innovative business opportunities.
 
A computer-on-module (COM) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board. However, unlike a single-board computer, the COM lacks the standard interfaces for input/output and connection to peripherals. These signals are brought out through standardized connectors to a custom carrier board which is designed for the specific embedded application.

 
COM Express Flyer
COM Express Type 7

COM Express was developed and is maintained by PICMG (PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers Group). COM Express was released in the summer of 2005 and is the most widely used COM standard. The standard defines the physical size, interconnect, and thermal interface for a COM.The original COM Express specification was written to support peripherals that were available at the time of release – including USB 2.0, SATA, PATA, Ethernet, VGA, LVDS, SDVO, PCI, and PCI Express Gen 1. Several pinout types were defined by PICMG with each one having a specific combination of peripherals, expansion interfaces and connector layout. The most widely used COM Express module is a type 2, followed by type 1.
 
With the introduction of new display interfaces in the embedded market such as HDMI and Displayport it was time for a major upgrade of the COM Express specification. In the summer of 2010. The updated specification was called “PICMG® COM.0 rev 2.0”. and defined a new type 6 that allowed for HDMI, DVI and Displayport display interfaces, for USB 3.0 and for more PCI Express lanes. Besides the pinout changes two more form factors where formalized : COMPACT (95x95mm) and Mini (84x55mm).
 
The ADLINK computer-on-modules with built-in SEMA Cloud functionality is ready-made for Internet of Things (IoT) applications. ADLINK COM Express modules are able to connect legacy industrial devices and other IoT systems to the cloud, extract raw data from these devices, determine which data to save locally and which to send to the cloud for further analysis. The results these analyses can provide valuable information for policy decision making and generate innovative business opportunities.
 
A computer-on-module (COM) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board. However, unlike a single-board computer, the COM lacks the standard interfaces for input/output and connection to peripherals. These signals are brought out through standardized connectors to a custom carrier board which is designed for the specific embedded application.

 
COM Express Flyer
COM Express Type 2

COM Express was developed and is maintained by PICMG (PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers Group). COM Express was released in the summer of 2005 and is the most widely used COM standard. The standard defines the physical size, interconnect, and thermal interface for a COM.The original COM Express specification was written to support peripherals that were available at the time of release – including USB 2.0, SATA, PATA, Ethernet, VGA, LVDS, SDVO, PCI, and PCI Express Gen 1. Several pinout types were defined by PICMG with each one having a specific combination of peripherals, expansion interfaces and connector layout. The most widely used COM Express module is a type 2, followed by type 1.
 
With the introduction of new display interfaces in the embedded market such as HDMI and Displayport it was time for a major upgrade of the COM Express specification. In the summer of 2010. The updated specification was called “PICMG® COM.0 rev 2.0”. and defined a new type 6 that allowed for HDMI, DVI and Displayport display interfaces, for USB 3.0 and for more PCI Express lanes. Besides the pinout changes two more form factors where formalized : COMPACT (95x95mm) and Mini (84x55mm).
 
The ADLINK computer-on-modules with built-in SEMA Cloud functionality is ready-made for Internet of Things (IoT) applications. ADLINK COM Express modules are able to connect legacy industrial devices and other IoT systems to the cloud, extract raw data from these devices, determine which data to save locally and which to send to the cloud for further analysis. The results these analyses can provide valuable information for policy decision making and generate innovative business opportunities.
 
A computer-on-module (COM) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board. However, unlike a single-board computer, the COM lacks the standard interfaces for input/output and connection to peripherals. These signals are brought out through standardized connectors to a custom carrier board which is designed for the specific embedded application.

 
COM Express Flyer
COM Express Type 10

COM Express was developed and is maintained by PICMG (PCI Industrial Computer Manufacturers Group). COM Express was released in the summer of 2005 and is the most widely used COM standard. The standard defines the physical size, interconnect, and thermal interface for a COM.The original COM Express specification was written to support peripherals that were available at the time of release – including USB 2.0, SATA, PATA, Ethernet, VGA, LVDS, SDVO, PCI, and PCI Express Gen 1. Several pinout types were defined by PICMG with each one having a specific combination of peripherals, expansion interfaces and connector layout. The most widely used COM Express module is a type 2, followed by type 1.
 
With the introduction of new display interfaces in the embedded market such as HDMI and Displayport it was time for a major upgrade of the COM Express specification. In the summer of 2010. The updated specification was called “PICMG® COM.0 rev 2.0”. and defined a new type 6 that allowed for HDMI, DVI and Displayport display interfaces, for USB 3.0 and for more PCI Express lanes. Besides the pinout changes two more form factors where formalized : COMPACT (95x95mm) and Mini (84x55mm).
 
The ADLINK computer-on-modules with built-in SEMA Cloud functionality is ready-made for Internet of Things (IoT) applications. ADLINK COM Express modules are able to connect legacy industrial devices and other IoT systems to the cloud, extract raw data from these devices, determine which data to save locally and which to send to the cloud for further analysis. The results these analyses can provide valuable information for policy decision making and generate innovative business opportunities.
 
A computer-on-module (COM) is a complete computer built on a single circuit board. However, unlike a single-board computer, the COM lacks the standard interfaces for input/output and connection to peripherals. These signals are brought out through standardized connectors to a custom carrier board which is designed for the specific embedded application.

 
COM Express Flyer
SMARC

The SMARC (“Smart Mobility ARChitecture”) is a versatile small form factor computer-on-module definition targeting applications that require low power, low costs, and high performance. The Computer-on-modules will typically use ARM SOCs similar or the same as those used in many familiar devices such as tablet computers and smart phones. Alternative low power SOCs and CPUs, such as tablet oriented X86 devices and other RISC CPUs may be used as well. The Module power envelope is typically under 6W.
 
The Computer-on-modules are used as building blocks for portable and stationary embedded systems. The core CPU and support circuits, including DRAM, boot flash, power sequencing, CPU power supplies, GBE and a single channel LVDS display transmitter are concentrated on the Module. The Computer-on-modules are used with application specific Carrier Boards that implement other features such as audio CODECs, touch controllers, wireless devices, etc. The modular approach allows scalability, fast time to market and upgradability while still maintaining low costs, low power and small physical size.
 
To stress on its low power consumption feature, ADLINK has named SMARC products as LEC (Low Energy Computer on module) series.

 

 
SMARC Brochure
Qseven

Qseven is a Computer-on-Module (COM) standard for small sized and highly integrated systems adopted by SGET.
 

The Qseven concept is an off-the-shelf, multi-vendor, Computer-on-Module that integrates all the core components of a common PC and is mounted onto an application specific carrier board. Qseven modules have a standardized form factor of 70 mm x 70 mm or 40 mm x 70 mm and have specified pinouts based on the high-speed MXM connector, regardless of the vendor. The Qseven module provides the functional requirements for an embedded application, which include, but are not limited to, graphics, audio, mass storage, network and multiple USB ports. A single ruggedized 230 pin MXM connector provides the carrier board interface to carry all the I/O signals to and from the Qseven module. This MXM connector is a well-known and proven high-speed signal interface connector that is commonly used for -PCI Express graphics cards in notebooks.
 

The Qseven footprint is smaller than that of COM Express, ETX or XTX, responding to system designers’ needs for minimal space. Qseven’s power consumption envelope is below a 12 watts target, whereas SMARC’s target is below 6 watts and COM Express can be well above 20 watts. Therefore, Qseven designs provide mid-range power values between those of SMARC and COM Express. The Qseven pincount is 230 compared to 314 and 440 for SMARC and COM Express (Type 2), respectively. Thus, it is optimized for designs with lower board-to-board pin requirements.

 

 
QSeven Modules Flyer
ETX

The ETX computer-on-module specification includes the standard functions required for almost any application, such as graphics, Ethernet, audio, IDE, floppy, keyboard/mouse, parallel, serial and USB ports, and PCI and ISA system busses.

 

A custom designed carrier board complements the ETX core module with additional functionality that is required for a specific application. The carrier board provides the interface to connect the module to peripherals such as hard disk, mouse, and display. Connectors on the carrier board can be placed exactly where needed to optimize the final package and minimize cabling. This results in a more reliable product and simplifies system integration. A single carrier board can be used with different ETX modules when the same functionality is required at different performance levels, allowing great ease in end product diversification

Engineering Tools
DB40 Debug Module
The DB40 Debug Card is designed for debugging of COM Express and PC/104 boards. It includes the following features: – Port 80/81 decoding for Power On Self Test (POST) via LPC – Interface to SPI Flash for BIOS update – Interface to Board Management Controller (BMC) for update – Power and Reset buttons and status LEDs The DB40 Debug card can only be used on products that have the appropriate FFC debug connector designed for this purpose. (Includes DB40 Debug Module, two 40-pin FFC cables, and 14-pin cable for SP100 DediProg USB to SPI programmer.)
BattMan: Smart Battery Management Reference Design
BattMan is a proof of concept for early prototyping and testing of battery powered systems with COM Express modules. The BattMan Starter Kit comes with a battery management module, two smart batteries, a power adapter and a USB flash drive loaded with BattMan board reference schematics and documentation.
FPTB: LVDS-to-TTL Transfer Board
The Flat Panel Transfer Board (FPTB) allows prototyping and verification of TTL flat panel displays with COM Express modules that support LVDS output only. The FPTB includes an LVDS-to-TTL converter, onboard PWM circuitry to support backlight control for LVDS and TTL displays, and has a EDID EEPROM to enable plug and play flat panel support.
FPTB: FI-CH7307: ADD2 DVI Card
The FI-CH7307 is an ADD2 DVI Card that fits into a standard PCIe x16 slot and converts SDVO signals to DVI display output.
T6-DDI: Type 6 DDI Video Adapter Card
The T6-DDI Video Adapter Card provides connector access to COM Express® Type 6 module Digital Display Interface (DDI) outputs. The T6-DDI adapter provides three output channels that can be set to either HDMI or DisplayPort independently and includes a passive DisplayPort to DVI dongle. The T6-DDI is designed for use with the ADLINK Express-BASE6 Type 6 carrier board via a PCIe x16 slot with proprietary DDI pinout
LPC_DEBUG_2: LPC POST Debug Board
The LPC_DEBUG_2 is an LPC POST debug board equipped with POST Status LEDs. It can be easily connected to the LPC debug port on all ADLINK Computer-on-Modules to monitor BIOS POST status.
P16TO28: PCIe x16-to-two-x8 Adapter Card
The P16TO28 adapter card allows you to run two PCIe x8 add-on cards from a single PCIe x16 slot. The card plugs into a standard PCIe x16 slot and splits the signals into two separate x8 connectors (front and rear).
COM-T6T2: Type 6 to Type 2 Adapter Board
The COM-T6T2 adapter board allows COM Express Type 6 modules to be backwards compatible with Type 2 carrier boards. An onboard SATA-to-PATA converter and PCIe-to-PCI bridge provide signal conversion for the required COM Express Type 2 interfaces. The SDVO port is rerouted to correspond to the Type 2 pin definition (PCIe x16 is not supported).